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Past Seminars

2018 – 2019 Seminars

Our Professional Development Seminars are aimed at providing a wide range of cutting-edge topics in the field of substance use disorders and behavioral health, such as Redefining Relapse Prevention Counseling with Substance Users and Ex-offenders, The Application of Multi-Sensory Practices in Trauma Treatment, and The Challenge of Preventionists in the Era of Medical Marijuana, Legal Weed, and Pot Gummy Bears. Seminars are taught by experts from around the country and approved for continuing education. Seminars are generally held at the Rutgers Center of Alcohol and Substance Use Studies, Smithers Hall, Busch Campus.

October

Thursday, 10/25/18
Counseling, Programming and Policy in the Age of Legal Marijuana

This course will provide an overview of the history of marijuana policy in America and will cover both state and federal laws. It will focus on the most recent US and International studies on marijuana to discuss how it affects the brain and the body. Participants will take part in a discussion about the seven great marijuana myths (including that it is harmless and non-addictive). We will discuss how marijuana criminalization has affected the criminal justice system. The economics of marijuana will be a particular focus, as the instructor will discuss medical marijuana, taxes, regulation, marketing and how marijuana may be a new big tobacco.
Instructor: Frank Greenagel, LCSW, LCADC, ACSW, CJC

November

Thursday, 11/1/18
Dialectical Behavioral Therapy: An Overview

Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) addressing a variety of presenting problems that are related to emotion dysregulation.  There have been adaptations made to the original model that was designed to treat borderline personality disorder to address the treatment of co-occurring substance use disorders.  This workshop will review the foundations of DBT such as the biosocial theory, dialectical abstinence, mindfulness, and the importance of balancing acceptance and change techniques.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD

Monday, 11/5/18
Horizon BCBSNJ- Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Training

Horizon-BCBSNJ is pleased to offer by invitation only a Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment Training (SBIRT) training opportunity.  This three (3) day training class, presented by Rutgers University Center for Alcohol Studies, is designed for Value-Based clinical staff such as but not exclusive to:  physicians, nurses, care coordinators, medical assistants and behavioral health professionals.  
Instructor: Katherine Glick, LPC, LCADC, CCS, ACS, MAC, BCHHP

Wednesday, 11/4/18
Participatory Cinema: Psychotic Disorders Film: The Fugitive

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. The film The Fugitive highlights Dr. Richard Kimble who manifests signs and symptoms of paranoid delusions upon the murder for his wife, making the film a valuable medium to teach the psychotic disorders.     
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

Thursday, 11/8/18
Evidence Based Approaches for Co-Occuring Disorders

Research supports the use of evidence-based therapies to address co-occurring mental health/substance use disorders.  Working with co-occurring disorders can be challenging and evidence-based therapies are helpful for these consumers.  There are a growing number of resources to learn about these therapies and techniques.  Besides being helpful to our consumers, insurances are asking for clinicians to use evidence-based therapies in their work with these consumers.  This workshop is designed to give participants an overview of co-occurring disorders, define evidence-based therapies and highlight a number of evidence-based therapies that are being used with members of this consumer group.  Specific techniques to be reviewed include Motivational Interviewing, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Mindfulness, Medication Management including Medication Assisted Therapy, and Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing.
Instructor: Veronika Williams, LPC, LCADC, ACS, and Karen Kahn, LCSW, LCADC, CCS, MAC

Thursday, 11/15/18
What Does Recovery Look Like?

The goal of this workshop is to help participants move from an “all or nothing” understanding of recovery to a new paradigm of recovery from different perspectives. By using a person centered approach the presenters will discuss models of recovery including harm reduction and abstinence based models, medication assisted recovery (including the use of Suboxone, Naltrexone, Vivitrol and Methadone),  an overview of psychosocial interventions such as motivational interviewing and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), and the role of individual factors in recovery.  This will include a discussion of dopamine and its role in addiction as well as helping clients learn how to replenish their own dopamine by stimulating personal sources of joy and hope in their lives.
Instructor: Elaine Edelman, PhD, LCSW and Amanda Wexler, LCSW

Thursday, 11/29/118
Smoking Cessation: Using MI to help clients address Tobacco and Marijuana

This class will help prepare counselors to more effectively identify and assess for tobacco and marijuana use of their clients. This includes understanding how to discern different routes of nicotine and marijuana delivery and to understand the effects they have on the body. Identifying ways of intervening to help promote abstinence using Motivational Interviewing will be utilized. Different Nicotine Replacement Therapies will be discussed as well as dispelling the myth of the new “healthier” wave of e-cigarettes and vaping.
Instructor: Joel Levine, LCSW, LPC, LCADC, LMFT

Friday, 11/30/18
Beyond Rainbows and Unicorns: Discovering the Intersectionality of LGBTQIA and Substance Use

There is much research that supports the fact that LGBTQ and other sexual minorities experience a higher level of stress and subsequent mental health and addiction disparities compared to those individuals who are of the sexual majority.  Despite this fact, however, many practitioners report feeling ill-equipped and lacking competence to treat this population.  This course will prepare the addiction and mental health practitioner with accurately recognizing, assessing, and treating individuals who identify as LGBTQIA who are struggling with substance abuse and related problems.  Special attention will be paid to comprehension of sexuality self-identifier terms, culturally-specific risk and etiological factors, and evidence-based culturally-competent treatment considerations.  Participants will have the opportunity to examine their own socialization around sexuality, and how it has impacted them personally and professionally up until present day. 
Instructor: Katherine Glick, LPC, LCADC, CCS, ACS, MAC, BCHHP

December

Thursday, 12/6/18
Disordered Eating and Substance Use

This course will focus on deconstructing maladaptive eating behaviors from a Biopsychosocial Perspective. Variables influencing food choice and risk factors and vulnerabilities to compulsive eating behaviors will be discussed from a variety of perspectives.  Education will be provided regarding food and the brain’s reward pathway and the addictive qualities of certain foods, with special attention paid to Binge Eating Disorder and how it mirrors compulsive drug taking.
Instructor: Katherine Glick, LPC, LCADC, CCS, ACS, MAC, BCHHP

Wednesday, 12/12/18
Participatory Cinema: Sleep Disorders Film: A Nightmare Before Christmas

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. The film The Nightmare Before Christmas delves into the role sleep and dreams play in our conscious awareness making the film a valuable medium to teach the sleep disorders.     
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

Thursday, 12/13/18
Treatment Strategies for Facilitating Groups and Getting Clients “Unstuck”

Clients often enter treatment with limited skills to meet the demands and challenges of recovery.  Professionals often understand Substance Use Disorder and the family dynamics, but may lack the practical knowledge or experience to initiate, provide, and model, a wide variety of skills for creative problem solving, dynamic thinking or developing their perceptive skills.  This session provides counselors and therapists strategies to encourage dynamic thinking, to use more of their brain, and numerous approaches for assessing and then generating options to address change and challenges.  This session will provide you some tools to assist your groups in developing reasonable risk tolerance, unleashing their creative brain, and regaining the potential and creativity that resides within.
Instructor: John K. Kriger, MSM, LCADC, CPS

Thursday, 12/20/18
Implementing Cultural Humility into Treatment for Latinos with Substance Use Disorders

This interactive training will provide an overview of cultural humility, acculturation, multiculturalism and intersectionality as a part of the engagement process. The main focus will be place on providing cultural sensitive psychotherapeutic interventions to address behavioral change specific for Latino individuals with substance use disorders. Through videos, case scenarios, and small group discussion, participants gain insight into cultural assumptions and will learn helpful engagement strategies.
Instructor: Mayte Redcay, LCSW, LCADC

January

Thursday, 1/3/19
Communities of Color, Substance Abuse, Cultural Awareness and Humility

Racial and ethnic communities currently make up about a third of the population of the nation and are expected to become a majority by 2050. Research shows that People of Color (POC) disproportionately suffer from mental health and substance use disorders when compared to their White counterparts.  Social policy, health disparities and institutional protocols often lead to POC experiencing a greater burden in accessing mental and substance use services. 
This workshop is designed to enhance substance and mental health providers’ ability to recognize the socio-political forces and barriers they must navigate to ensure services are culturally competent.  Using a historical lens, participants will have the opportunity to acquire an understanding of individual, micro- and macro-level cultural barriers, that lead to risk and poorer health in communities of color.
Instructor: Yvette Murry, MSW, LCSW

Wednesday, 1/9/19
Participatory Cinema: Somatoform Disorders

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. The film The Sixth Sense highlights Cole Sear who in discovering his gift, uncovers an extraordinary case of Factitious Disorder, making the film a valuable medium to teach the somatic symptom/related disorders.    
“I see dead people.” When young Cole Sear spoke those words, he had no idea of how big a blockbuster this film would be or how it would come to be central to a curriculum that teaches a group of mental disorders called the Somatic Symptom Disorders.  
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

Thursday, 1/10/19
Pharmacology and Physiology

This class will help prepare Counselors to more effectively work with their clients by understanding the brain structure and client’s clinical presentation. This includes understanding how to identify symptomology and the characters of addiction through a brain disease model. This includes identifying classes of pharmacotherapies. This class will educate Drug and Alcohol Counselors in the identification of Neural Receptor sites and the science of addiction. At the end of this course, the students will: Instructor: Joel Levine, LCSW, LPC, LCADC, LMFT

Thursday, 1/17/19
Substance Use and Suicide Risk

This course will explore the ways in which substance abuse and suicide are associated. Students will examine the data in which age, gender, and ethnicity impact suicidal thoughts and behaviors, and discuss various aspects of suicide assessment including risk and protective factors, and tools & methods that can be used in crisis. This course will discuss the screening tools utilized in addressing harmful/risky substance use and gambling issues that can contribute to increased suicidal thoughts/behaviors, as well as describe the benefit of self-care for providers who work with clients who are at higher risk of suicide.
Instructor: Thomas Etts, LCSW, LCADC

Thursday, 1/24/19
Working with Couples from a Developmental Model

Treating couples in therapy effectively takes specialized training. There are a variety of couples models available to help clinicians assess, conceptualize and intervene effectively.  The developmental model created by Dr. Ellyn Bader integrates neuroscience, differentiation theory and neuroscience to improve your diagnosis and treatment approach for all couples.  This workshop will focused on a developmental perspective which involves identifying what developmental stage the couple is in, developing empathy for each partner, enhancing motivation an improving communication.
Instructor: NathalieEdmond, Psy D

Monday, 1/28/18 and Tuesday, 1/29/19
Motivational Interviewing: The Basics

This introductory two-day workshop offers practitioners in alcohol and other drugs prevention, criminal justice, health care and social services the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and to begin to incorporate them into their work. This two-day training will discuss this effective approach in the care of challenging clients, and provide participants with an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating these approaches into an effective therapeutic intervention with an understanding about when to use MI. Motivational Interviewing is a client/ patient centered, evidence-based practice and guiding method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. During this two-day workshop, participants will learn the basics of Motivational Interviewing; explore ways of integrating Motivational Interviewing theories into other types of care approaches, and practice Motivational Interviewing on “challenging” client/ patient through real (as opposed to role) playing and discussion.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS,CGP

Wednesday, 1/30/19
Motivational Interviewing: The Power of Groups

This one-day training will provide information on how to use groups as a treatment strategy and incorporate Motivational Interviewing. We will address why using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is extremely effective. Group work provides several important steps that help break isolation often experienced by a consumer.  This training experience will provide information on the issues and care of special populations (adolescents, dual diagnosis, addiction, intimacy, low-income families, parents, etc.) through the use of support groups in care.  We will also explore the issues of assessment, interaction, group norms, and various forms of support for the consumer within the context of Motivational Interviewing..  We will also address “why” the therapeutic support group format is extremely effective.  We will also assess how the role of the group leader and the roles of the participants play in the group process and explore the importance of therapeutic contracts, goal setting, group frequency, duration and process some stages of group development.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS,CGP

Thursday, 1/31/19
Smoking Cessation: Using MI to help clients address Tobacco and Marijuana

This class will help prepare counselors to more effectively identify and assess for tobacco and marijuana use of their clients. This includes understanding how to discern different routes of nicotine and marijuana delivery and to understand the effects they have on the body. Identifying ways of intervening to help promote abstinence using Motivational Interviewing will be utilized. Different Nicotine Replacement Therapies will be discussed as well as dispelling the myth of the new “healthier” wave of e-cigarettes and vaping.
Instructor: Joel Levine, LCSW, LPC, LCADC, LMFT

February

Thursday, 2/7/19
Through a Trauma Informed Lens: Rethinking Addiction Treatment

Providers of substance abuse treatment recognize that most clients have trauma histories that complicate treatment and compromise recovery. Kaiser Permanente’s Adverse Childhood Experiences study has officially established the link between traumatic childhood experiences and the risk of developing addictions. Therefore, providing trauma-informed substance abuse treatment is imperative; and this requires a paradigm shift in how we think about addiction and how we interpret and respond to the behaviors commonly seen in individuals with substance use disorders. This session will define and describe a trauma informed approach to addiction treatment and will assist clinicians in creating trauma-sensitive environments and providing effective trauma-focused interventions. Participants will be guided in a critical examination of current addiction treatment models through a trauma lens and be informed as to how to make the changes necessary in their practice to provide trauma-informed addiction treatment that will improve treatment outcomes.
Instructor: Debra Rusiard, DSW, LCSW

Thursday, 2/14/19
The Opioid Crisis: Where do we go from here?

This course will retrace the history of opiate use from opium to prescription drugs and track the long history of heroin use. We will delve into Medical Industrial Complex and look at how Big Pharma, doctors, insurance companies, marketers, the FDA, governmental policies, and consumers each hold some responsibility for the current epidemic. Professor Greenagel will reference the NY Times, LA Times, Washington Post, NBC News, the CDC, a number of professional journals, and scores of local papers.
Every group comes out poorly here.
Positive actions that have been taken by local, county, city, and state governments will be examined. We will have a discussion about the Federal response. Data will be reviewed and we will discuss indicators that can be seen as measurable outcomes.
This course is steeped in public policy, and the information provided here will be helpful to clinicians and clinical directors for use in individual and group sessions, as well as program design (improvement) and evaluation.
Fair warning: it will be extremely difficult to leave this course and not be angry.
Instructor: Frank Greenagel, LCSW, LCADC, ACSW, CJC

Wednesday, 2/20/19
Participatory Cinema: Cognitive Disorders Film: Coraline

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. The film Coraline focuses on the eponymous character who demonstrates aspects of delirium, making the film a valuable medium to teach the cognitive disorders. 
Using film to teach about mental illness provides an interesting opportunity to analyze the human condition. Using computer generated films only makes things more interesting. Through interpretation of this dark fantasy horror film, learners will take part in a discussion of cognitive disorders such as delirium and dementia (major neurocognitive disorder).
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

Wednesday, 2/21/19
Women with Addiction Disorders: An Interpersonal Neurobiological Approach

There are a variety of treatment approaches available for the treatment of addiction.  In recent years there has been an increase in research around the use of mindfulness, the neuroscience of addiction, the role of trauma and attachment, and addressing underlying mental health issues with traditional 12 step addiction treatment.  This workshop will explore best practices in the treatment of addiction disorders particularly in women using best practices from an interpersonal neurobiological perspective.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD

Thursday, 2/28/19
A Shifting Paradigm: Addressing Substance Use and Co-Occurring Disorders in a Changing Treatment Environment

Addiction treatment has evolved a great deal in the past several decades. What was once a 12 Step dominated approach to substance use treatment has shifted toward incorporation of evidence-based treatment practices and approaches to improve outcomes with our changing clientele. This shifting paradigm includes implementation of Harm Reduction and Medication Assisted Treatment for Substance Use Disorders, particularly related to the current opioid epidemic. In addition, growing attention toward Co-Occurring Mental Health Disorders in substance use treatment has also impacted our overall treatment approach. As a result, clinicians in addiction treatment have needed to increase utilization of motivational and insight-oriented strategies for clients with increasingly complex issues in our care. Furthermore, clinicians and supervisors in both mental health and addiction treatment environments must be prepared to provide integrated care, involving a greater knowledge base and set of skills. This seminar provides an overview of many of the changes in the substance use/co-occurring treatment field as well as some of the skills, tools and evidence based practices needed for our changing world.
Instructor: Kenneth Pecoraro, LCSW, LCADC

March

Wednesday, 3/6/19
Disordered Eating and Substance Use

This course will focus on deconstructing compulsive eating behaviors from a Biopsychosocial Perspective. Risk factors and vulnerabilities to compulsive behaviors will be discussed from a variety of perspectives. Education will be provided regarding food and the brain’s reward pathway, the addictive qualities of certain foods, and Binge Eating Disorder. Preventative strategies will also be discussed. Disordered eating will be discussed in relation to substance use.
Instructor: Katherine Glick, LPC, LCADC, CCS, ACS, MAC, BCHHP

Thursday, 3/7/19
A Public Health Model for Understanding Community: Substance Use, Abuse & Treatment

This workshop will explore a larger-system public health approach to understanding community substance use, abuse & the treatment profession. These issues are viewed in cultural and developmental context, taking into account economic, political, and sociological levels of analysis.  In United States culture, this workshop focuses upon how the relationships between the private sector, public sector, and substance abuse profession, mesh to generate community substance use/abuse outcomes and impacts the treatment practices of substance abuse professionals. Participants will learn an additional method to objectively evaluate how cultural factors impact community substance use, and the methods used to provide treatment services.
Instructor: Robert Russo, MA, CAS

Thursday, 3/14/19
Crisis Intervention with De-Escalation Techniques

In addressing client encounters that have a potential to escalate, it is imperative that you keep yourself safe. It is important to understand the impact of the environment and how to remain effective in that environment. This class will teach the key ingredients to a successful client encounter using relational skills, and identify de-escalation techniques that can be employed to maximize therapeutic effectiveness. Participants will learn how to have a respectful dialogue with their clients, and the importance of their nonverbal cues.
Instructor: Thomas Etts, LCSW, LCADC

Wednesday, 3/20/19
Participatory Cinema: Addiction (non-substance-related) Film: Game Night

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. The film Game Night demonstrates aspects of Gambling Addiction making the film a valuable medium to teach the addictive disorders.     
Game Night is a 2018 black comedy depicting Max and Annie during one of their routine weekend game nights that turns out to be anything but routine. In addition to murder and intrigue, the film serves as a rich medium to review the Addictive Disorders.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

Thursday, 3/21/19
From Social Gaming to Internet Gambling: Identifying the Connection, Addressing the Issues, and Establishing Meaningful Recovery Principles

Consistently, there are more creative and fast paced forms of entertainment to help people escape, cope, or adjust to the stressors of life. Whether finding it through substance, social media, YouTube, or a variety of other methods, individuals are becoming more daring, tech savvy and tech dependent. From a technology perspective, one area that has seen explosive growth exists in the world of skill-based, social and internet gaming. The rise in popularity of eSports and Daily Fantasy Sports (DFS) has resulted in an increase in gamers worldwide seeking fast-paced action, escape, and sometimes a chance to win money. With that in mind, studies have started to show a correlation between early onset adolescent gaming as a gateway to problem gambling or other potential issues that may arise later in life. Problem gambling is linked to many individual, public health, and social problems including: depression, suicide, significant debt, bankruptcy, family conflict, domestic violence, neglect and maltreatment of children and criminal offenses. As with any addiction, treatment and early intervention utilizing various approaches can be very effective. This workshop will provide an overview and analysis of gaming and gambling, the behavioral, emotional and psychological warning signs, and considerations for recovery including key principles and barriers.
Instructor: Daniel J. Trolaro, MS

Thursday, 3/28/19 and Friday, 3/29/19
Motivational Interviewing: Advancing the Practice

The two-day advanced level workshop allows Motivational Interviewing (MI) trained substance use, criminal justice, health care, and social service practitioners to review and expand on the practice of MI care approaches toward effective therapeutic interventions. This two-day training will discuss this effective approach in the treatment of substance use, co-occurring, and other challenging symptoms, and provide participants with an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating these approaches into an effective intervention. Participants will be offered a brief review and practice of, Motivational Interviewing spirit, some basic skills and structure with an overview of what’s important to the client. Participants will learn more about “change talk” and methods of communication to better elicit from clients. We will also consider how Motivational Interviewing overlaps with other models. This course will provide both useful theoretical models and hands-on opportunities to improve skills.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS,CGP

April

Thursday, 4/4/19
The Psychology of Happiness: Working with Substance Use Disorders

In this seminar, participants will learn about the scientific study of Positive Psychology and the strategies used to cultivate what is best within ourselves and to enhance one’s experiences of love, work and play.  Positive psychology practices will be discussed within the biological, personal, relational, institutional, cultural, and global dimensions of life.
Instructor: Katherine Glick, LPC, LCADC, CCS, ACS, MAC, BCHHP

Wednesday, 4/10/19
Participatory Cinema: Mood Disorders

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. Disney’s The Lion King demonstrates aspects of bereavement making the film a valuable medium to teach the mood disorders.     
This seminar will borrow from a medical school course that teaches addiction medicine through animated Walt Disney classics! Join us at the Center of Alcohol Studies when we analyze Disney’s The Lion King as a sensational case study of a substance-induced mood disorder.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

Thursday, 4/11/19
CADC/LCADC Mandatory Renewal Course

The LCADC/ACADC Mandatory Renewal Course meets the requirements for six contact hours of continuing education in legal standards related to the practice of alcohol and drug counseling. [See N.J.A.C. 13:34C-5.2(d)]. In order to register for this seminar, individuals must have an active LCADC/CADC.  NOTE: This course IS NOT approved for initial certification courses C501 or C502.
Instructor: Bill Kane

Thursday, 4/18/19
Legal and Ethical Issues in Addiction Treatment

This seminar uses case studies, practical applications, and checklists to deliver foremost legal principles including counselor licensing statutes and regulations. Federal, state, and agency laws applicable to alcohol and other drug abuse treatment also covers malpractice liability issues, DWI, domestic violence, employment rights, AIDS, and ADA. Students will become familiar with the federal regulations governing Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse patient records, applicability interacting with HIPAA Privacy Rule and proper handling of subpoenas and court orders. Students will receive real life experience interacting with courts and public agencies by developing a brief report and practice with expert witness testimony.
Instructor: Bill Kane

Friday, 4/19/19
Family Therapy

In this course counselors will learn how to apply family therapy practice and theory in the assessment and treatment of families and couples focusing on drug and alcohol use with particular attention paid to adolescents and cultural issues. Drug using behavior will be addressed as both the focus of therapeutic attention and as a symptom of structure and process issues within the family system. Appropriate interventions that guide families in reaching new and more productive levels of functioning will be discussed and demonstrated.
Instructor: Robert Lynn, EdD, LPC

Monday, 4/22/19-Thursday, 4/25/19
Certified Clinical Supervision (CCS) Certification Course

The substance abuse and mental health field is constantly changing. Staff need training in an array of issues, including working in a cost-driven world, new legal and ethical standards and requirements in the digital age, and how to prevent burnout. Training resources are often limited. Clinical supervision is the cornerstone for staff development and quality assurance. 
This intensive course provides a foundation for supervision and management of personnel. Based on “The Blended Model of Clinical Supervision in Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counseling”, by Dr. David Powell, it fulfills many of the training requirements for certification in clinical supervision of the International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium. Additional models will be explored including Dr. Michael Carroll’s “Critical Reflection” and Stoltenberg’s Integrative Developmental Model. This course is recommended for present and future supervisors. It is ideal for agencies to train their management staff, and for anyone working towards the 30 hour pre-certification required training.
Instructor: Alan Lyme, LCSW, ICADC, ICCS

May

Thursday, 5/2/19
Racial Awareness in the Therapy Room

Race is an important identity for many individuals, particularly people of color, though it is often not discussed explicitly in the therapy room.  Those individuals who identify as white may not prioritize race as one of their identities or have a comfort level discussing how their race may impact the therapeutic relationship.  A client’s perception of the clinician’s racial awareness can impact engagement in treatment.  The seminar will explore cultural competence, cultural humility, microaggressions and implicit bias and its relevance in practicing ethically.  Strategies for conceptualizing and discussing race and the intersectionality of identities will be explored.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD

Thursday, 5/9/19 and Friday, 5/10/19
Motivational Interviewing: Practice of Supervision and Coaching

This two-day training will include effective methods of supervising workers and provide an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating effective interventions with workers in motivating them to grow in skill and work with our most “challenging” clients. The experience of parallel process using Motivational Interviewing in supervision and coaching staff in using the spirit, structure and skills will be illustrated using case presentations and interactive exercises. This course best defined as a worker centered guiding method for enhancing the intrinsic motivation within the worker by helping them to explore their counter transference and while using Motivational Interviewing as a client centered, evidence based model of treatment with clients in ambivalence.
The Motivational Interviewing Assessment: Supervisory Tools for Enhancing Proficiency (MIA:STEP) package is a collection of tools for mentoring counselors and other clinicians in the use of MI skills during clinical assessments. During the NIDA clinical trials research the MI assessment protocol improved both client attendance and retention during the first four weeks of outpatient care. The researchers also discovered that the development and maintenance of MI skills was a challenge for the counselors engaged in the study. Participating in workshop training was not sufficient preparation. Ongoing feedback and mentoring were needed in order for most counselors to use MI skillfully. This package of products is meant to be used in the context of clinical supervision or mentoring. Use of these tools can help enhance both counselor MI skills and the quality and nature of the mentoring process. It’s a win-win for clients and agency staff alike.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP

Thursday, 5/15/19
Participatory Cinema: Dissociative Disorders Film: The Sound of My Voice

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. Sound of My Voice demonstrates aspects of dissociative amnesia making the film a valuable medium to teach the dissociative disorders.     
Sound of My Voice is a 2011 psychological thriller depicting Peter and Lorna, a young couple making a film documentary on a secretive cult when they stumble across one of the most twisted cases of mental illness in filmography. This film is a hidden gem that’s greater value is in its depiction of a rare mental illness that will be the focus of this exciting seminar. 
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

Thursday, 5/16/19
Strategies for Anticipating and Preventing Premature Termination and Dropout

This course will detail the research evidence on variables affecting premature dropout and poor outcomes in psychotherapy. Elements of the therapeutic role and process, from intake through termination, will be discussed with specific attention paid to predictors of premature termination. Strategies for reducing client dropout will be discussed and applied to case examples, and participants will have the opportunity to try out new skills to navigate through therapeutic ruptures and other premature dropout risk factors.
Instructor: Katherine Glick, LPC, LCADC, CCS, ACS, MAC, BCHHP

Thursday, 5/23/19
Connecting with Spirituality in Addiction Treatment

Spirituality can impact mental health and functioning in positive and negative ways though there can be discomfort by clinicians to bring it up in treatment.  This seminar will explore ways clinicians can assess and incorporate spirituality into treatment, the importance of including spirituality, and the challenges in this area.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD

Thursday, 5/30/19
From the Bottom Up

Providers of substance abuse treatment recognize that most clients have trauma histories that complicate treatment and compromise recovery. Kaiser Permanente’s Adverse Childhood Experiences study has clearly established the link between traumatic childhood experiences and the risk of developing addictions. The reality is that we can no longer just treat the substance use disorder; the underlying trauma must also be addressed. Leading trauma experts have demonstrated that unresolved trauma is often stored in the body and interventions designed to primarily target cognitions are ineffective for individuals with complex trauma histories. Treatment programs are now seeking to adopt interventions that also treat the emotional and physical manifestations of trauma to improve recovery outcomes for their clients. This workshop will present a trauma-informed model of addiction treatment that combines sound addiction treatment protocols, poly vagal theory, emotional regulation skills training and body-based interventions. It will offer experiential exercises for participants to practice emotional regulation and body based interventions they can use in group and individual treatment.
Instructor: Debra Ruisard, DSW, LCSW

June

Wednesday, 6/5/19
Participatory Cinema: Personality Disorders

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. The Sandlot demonstrates aspects of personality development making the film a valuable medium to teach the Personality Disorders. Hope springs eternal in this 1993 coming-of-age sports comedy. The new-kid motif, neighborhood urban legends, and our national pastime merge to form a perfect medium to review personality theory and discuss the personality disorders.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD

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