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2019-2020 Seminars

Course Descriptions

December

Thursday, 12/12/19 – 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS19171: A Journey to Cultural Humility: From Reflection to Action through Intergroup Discourse- Part II

In order to progress from an ethnocentric worldview to an ethnorelative worldview, we must become culturally humble. Cultural humility refers to one’s ability to be open and willing to reflect on his or her own self as a cultural human being (Hook & Watkins, 2015). It is a lifelong process of self-reflection and self-critique that involves learning about another person’s culture while reflecting on one’s own beliefs and values and requires the practitioner to shift roles from being the expert to becoming a learner in order to effectively work with others (Foronda, Baptiste, Reinholdt, & Ousman, 2016; Fisher-Borne, Montana Cain, & Martin, 2015). The concepts of intersectionality and cultural humility are key elements of enhancing this lifelong process of learning and self-awareness in ourselves. Intersectionality as a framework is crucial to analyzing power and privilege, specifically focusing on the intersection of privilege and oppression. The practitioner has a dual role to learn and implement this concept in their personal and professional lives (Bubar, Cespedes, & Bundy-Fazioli, 2016). Intergroup discourse allows practitioners to reflect on and share their thoughts and experiences in a brave space through a nonhierarchical group. The Allies Model requires clinicians to be committed to life-long learning and growth, to use the privileges of a clinicians intersecting social identities to stand with marginalized groups, and to stand against intentional and unintentional forms of oppression. Being an ally denotes that we will be part of an inclusive community, stay in relationship with peers and colleagues, and to practice accountability to ourselves and each other by “calling in” rather than “calling out”. To become an ally, we must continually work on becoming culturally humble. This is a life-long process that can be achieved in an intergroup discourse with similar people.
Instructors: Natalie Moore-Bembry, EdD, MSW, LSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Cultural

Thursday, 12/19/19 – 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS19181: Videogame Addiction 101: The Latest Behavioral Disorder

Parents, teachers, and healthcare professionals are starting to discuss the concept of video game addiction in the United States. Alternatively countries in Asia have been treating video game addiction as a public health crisis for over a decade. Video game addiction is the latest behavioral disorder to hit the United States. Recent research in the United States found that up to 8.5% of U.S. youth meet the criteria for pathological gaming. While millions of Americans have already been affected by video game addiction, overall the United States is unprepared and ill-equipped to help. This seminar will discuss research, prevention and treatment to help attendees start to recognize and help individuals struggling with video game addiction.
With the recent release of the new ICD-11, video game addiction has become a public topic of discussion. News networks air segments of parents sharing how their children are addicted to video games. On the other end of the spectrum, many question if a person can really be “addicted” to a video game. Regardless of professional’s personal beliefs regarding video game addiction, it is imperative to be informed and provide services to those in need. While this issue is just starting to get examined in the United States, several Asian countries have been treating video game addiction as a national public health crisis. If the video game addiction trend in the United States is similar to video addiction trends in Asia, there is going to be a tremendous need for services. This workshop will explore the history of the gaming industry, starting with is inception in 1940 at the World’s Fair in New York up to present date with the popular hit Fortnite. A historical analysis helps shed light on explaining the complicated relationship between video games and the world overall. As the video game industry is a global industry, the history of video games in other regions of the world, particularly Asia, will also be explored. Video games rose to prominence in Asian countries much faster than it did in the United States. With the Asian video game markets more mature and gaming more readily acceptable, video game addiction has grown into a prominent societal problem. Starting in 2003, certain Asian countries started to draft legislation to combat video game addiction. Within a few years state sponsored treatment programs started to open to deal with the growing population size of citizens addicted to video games. Examination of the legislation and treatment in Asian countries can shed light on what the future may look like in the United States. The workshop will conclude with best practice recommendations for dealing with clients addicted to video games. Recommendations will also be made for best practices for family therapy for those who have a loved one who struggles with this disorder. Overall the objectives of this workshop is to inform attendees of a new disorder that may have a significant impact on the behavioral health field in years to come.
Instructor: Andrew Walsh, MSW, LSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6

January

Thursday, 1/9/20  –  9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS19211: Trauma Informed Care when treating Chronic Illness and Disabilities & Substance Abuse

Trauma Informed Care when treating Chronic Illness and Disabilities & Substance Abuse Research supports the need for trauma informed care when working with clients who have a chronic illness and or disability (CID). It further supports that CID patients in substance abuse treatment programs would benefit from treatment plan models that take into consideration trauma experienced in the past.  Research implies that there is a need to make a cultural shift when treating clients.  Practitioners who develop treatment plans must consider the possibility of triggering trauma, as wells work to prevent unintentional re-traumatization.  The purpose of this seminar is to provide the participant with information on chronic illness and disabilities, to understand the importance of trauma informed care and the benefit of a strong support system during recovery.
Instructor: Charlene Ransom, MSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Wednesday, 1/15/20  –  9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS877: Participatory Cinema: Anxiety Disorders

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. Join Buzz, Woody, and Disney’s cast of characters in our review of interpersonal dynamics that lead to anxiety states. We’ll also have some fun discovering Disney’s hidden messages in Toy Story to reach teaching points related to anxiety and drugs. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Thursday, 1/16/20   –   9:00 A.M-4:00 P.M
PDS1565: Dialectical Behavioral Therapy: Working with Substance Use Disorders

Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) addressing a variety of presenting problems that are related to emotion dysregulation.  There have been adaptations made to the original model that was designed to treat borderline personality disorder to address the treatment of co-occurring substance use disorders.  This workshop will review the foundations of DBT such as the biosocial theory, dialectical abstinence, mindfulness, and the importance of balancing acceptance and change techniques. It will focus on strategies for using DBT with substance use disorders.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD, RYT
Fee: $90
CE Credits: 6 clinical

Thursday, 1/23/20    9:00 A.M – 4:00 P.M
PDS19112: Completing the Circle: Integrating Mental and Physical Health Services into Addiction Treatment

It is well known that the prevalence of co-occurring mental health disorders in substance use treatment programs is extremely high and continues to rise. Research is also revealing that levels of medical and physical health issues in substance use treatment is equally as widespread. Therefore, it is now essential that substance use treatment programs provide integrated services for mental health and substance use disorders. Additionally, integration is now being taken a step further by introducing physical and medical health services into addiction treatment programs as well. This seminar provides an overview of some of the evolving changes in the addiction treatment field which necessitate fully integrated care. In addition, this seminar provides education, skills and other tools for clinicians, nurses, care managers and supervisors in substance use treatment programs to implement fully integrated services into their own substance use treatment programs.  The information is provided by an Advanced Practice Nurse with an addiction and medical background in combination with a clinician who has worked with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders for over 25 years to further expand the overall perspective of this seminar
Instructors: Julie Edwards, APN, FNP-c & Kenneth Pecoraro LCSW, LCADC, CCS
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 clinical

Wednesday, 1/29/20 – 1/30/20    9:00 A.M – 4:00 P.M
PDS857: Motivational Interviewing: The Basics

This introductory two-day workshop offers practitioners in alcohol and other drugs prevention, criminal justice, health care and social services the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and to begin to incorporate them into their work. This two-day training will discuss this effective approach in the care of challenging clients, and provide participants with an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating these approaches into an effective therapeutic intervention with an understanding about when to use MI. Motivational Interviewing is a client/ patient centered, evidence-based practice and guiding method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. During this two-day workshop, participants will learn the basics of Motivational Interviewing; explore ways of integrating Motivational Interviewing theories into other types of care approaches, and practice Motivational Interviewing on “challenging” client/ patient through real (as opposed to role) playing and discussion.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
Fee: $200.00
CE Credits: 12 Clinical

Friday, 1/31/20 –  9:00 A.M – 4:00 P.M
PDS867: Motivational Interviewing: The Power of Groups

This one-day training will provide information on how to use groups as a treatment strategy and incorporate Motivational Interviewing. We will address why using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is extremely effective. Group work provides several important steps that help break isolation often experienced by a consumer.  This training experience will provide information on the issues and care of special populations (adolescents, dual diagnosis, addiction, intimacy, low-income families, parents, etc.) through the use of support groups in care.  We will also explore the issues of assessment, interaction, group norms, and various forms of support for the consumer within the context of Motivational Interviewing..  We will also address “why” the therapeutic support group format is extremely effective.  We will also assess how the role of the group leader and the roles of the participants play in the group process and explore the importance of therapeutic contracts, goal setting, group frequency, duration and process some stages of group development.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

February

Thursday, 2/6/20 – 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS1684: Rewiring the Brain Using Mindfulness Based Practices 

There is increasing research supporting the neuroplasticity of the brain.  Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to reorganize itself throughout our life due to environment, behavior, thinking and emotions.  Neural Darwinism or neural pruning speaks to the idea that “neurons that fire together wire together” so the more we do of something the more habitual it becomes.   We can learn strategies soften the negativity bias that we are born with.  Brains that are impacted by trauma and addiction can heal.  This workshop will review science around the mind-body connection through discussion of polyvagal theory, neuroscience of meditation,  and helping clients develop trauma sensitive internal resources through a variety of mindfulness based practices that help to rewire the brain.   Mindfulness based clinical approaches such as sensorimotor psychotherapy, EMDR, DBT, compassion based practices, and meditation and yoga will be discussed.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD, RYT  
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Wednesday, 2 /12/20          9:00 A.M. –  4:00 P.M PDS7307 Participatory Cinema: Psychotic Disorders

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic.  One Hour Photo: What is your favorite Robin Williams film? What is your favorite Robin Williams film in which he’s psychotic? If you hesitated giving an answer, then join us in discovering what is perhaps Williams’ most intriguing role. Along the way, you’ll be introduced to the psychotic disorders and their potential impact on reality testing and overall functioning.  This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Thursday, 2/13/2020      9:00 A.M – 4 P.M
PDS1444: Through a Trauma Informed Lens: Rethinking Addiction Treatment

Providers of substance abuse treatment recognize that most clients have trauma histories that complicate treatment and compromise recovery. Kaiser Permanente’s Adverse Childhood Experiences study has officially established the link between traumatic childhood experiences and the risk of developing addictions. Therefore, providing trauma-informed substance abuse treatment is imperative; and this requires a paradigm shift in how we think about addiction and how we interpret and respond to the behaviors commonly seen in individuals with substance use disorders. This session will define and describe a trauma informed approach to addiction treatment and will assist clinicians in creating trauma-sensitive environments and providing effective trauma-focused interventions. Participants will be guided in a critical examination of current addiction treatment models through a trauma lens and be informed as to how to make the changes necessary in their practice to provide trauma-informed addiction treatment that will improve treatment outcomes.
Instructor: Debra Rusiard, DSW, LCSW
Fee: 90.00
CE Credits: 6 clinical

Thursday, 2/20/2020      9:00 A.M – 4:00 P.M
PDS19191: Connection Through Self-Compassion and Compassion for Others: Reaching and Teaching the Minds and Hearts of Those We Serve

Research in Neuroscience and the application of Compassion Focused Therapies have provided us with the information that the practice of Mindful Self-Compassion and Compassion for others has far-reaching effects on one’s physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual health. In her book, “Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself,” Kristen Neff details how self -kindness, mindfulness and a sense of common humanity, can replace the negative and diminishing self-criticism and self-judgment that so many engage in. Compassion therapies help to minimize destructive patterns of fear, anxiety, self-criticism and isolation, which if left untreated, can often lead to such at-risk behaviors as the experimentation, use and abuse of alcohol/drugs, eating disorders, suicidal ideation etc. Mindful Self-Compassion practice has been shown to aid in managing stress and trauma as well as the grieving processes which so many experience in their lives.
Instructor:  Roseann Cervelli, MS, LCADC, CCS, CPS
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 clinical

Thursday, 2/27/2020      9:00 A.M – 4:00 P.M
PDS1832: Domestic Violence 101

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, domestic violence accounts for approximately 17% of all violent crime in the United States (Planty, 2016). In this course, students will be able to define Domestic Violence and the six different forms of domestic violence. Acts of domestic violence are categorized into psychological battering, physical battering, or sexual abuse (The term domestic violence is still used, but more recently, physical, psychological, or sexual violence in the context of a relationship is called intimate partner violence. This course will provide participants with an introduction to domestic violence and intimate partner violence. It will also explore how the role of substance use disorders in domestic violence.
Instructor: Vanessa Ferreria, MA, MSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

March

Thursday, 3/5/2020    9:00 am – 4:00 pm
PDS2003: What Does Recovery Look Like?

The goal of this workshop is to help participants move from an “all or nothing” understanding of recovery to a new paradigm of recovery from different perspectives. By using a person centered approach the presenters will discuss models of recovery including harm reduction and abstinence based models, medication assisted recovery (including the use of Suboxone, Naltrexone, Vivitrol and Methadone),  an overview of psychosocial interventions such as motivational interviewing and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), and the role of individual factors in recovery.  This will include a discussion of dopamine and its role in addiction as well as helping clients learn how to replenish their own dopamine by stimulating personal sources of joy and hope in their lives.
Instructors: Elaine Edelman, PhD, LCSW; Amanda Wexler, LCSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Wednesday 3/11/20 –  9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS827: Participatory Cinema: Major Depressive, Bipolar and Related Disorders

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. Odd Thomas: Looking for a hidden gem? Have you ever stumbled upon a movie that is “among the best films no one knows about?” What if this same film also becomes the cornerstone of a discussion about mood disorders? Don’t let the title fool you: this is a rare opportunity to learn the mood disorders through a film’s plot that promises to surprise! This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical *

Thursday, 3/12/2020    – 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS2122: Racial Awareness in the Therapy Room

Race is an important identity for many individuals, particularly people of color, though it is often not discussed explicitly in the therapy room.  Those individuals who identify as white may not prioritize race as one of their identities or have a comfort level discussing how their race may impact the therapeutic relationship.  A client’s perception of the clinician’s racial awareness can impact engagement in treatment.  The seminar will explore cultural competence, cultural humility, microaggressions and implicit bias and its relevance in practicing ethically.  Strategies for conceptualizing and discussing race and the intersectionality of identities will be explored.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD, RYT
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Thursday, 3/19/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm PDS1923: From Social Gaming to Internet Gambling: Identifying the Connection, Addressing the Issues, and Establishing Meaningful Recovery Principles

Consistently, there are more creative and fast paced forms of entertainment to help people escape, cope, or adjust to the stressors of life. Whether finding it through substance, social media, YouTube, or a variety of other methods, individuals are becoming more daring, tech savvy and tech dependent. From a technology perspective, one area that has seen explosive growth exists in the world of skill-based, social and internet gaming. The rise in popularity of eSports and Daily Fantasy Sports (DFS) has resulted in an increase in gamers worldwide seeking fast-paced action, escape, and sometimes a chance to win money. With that in mind, studies have started to show a correlation between early onset adolescent gaming as a gateway to problem gambling or other potential issues that may arise later in life. Problem gambling is linked to many individual, public health, and social problems including: depression, suicide, significant debt, bankruptcy, family conflict, domestic violence, neglect and maltreatment of children and criminal offenses. As with any addiction, treatment and early intervention utilizing various approaches can be very effective. This workshop will provide an overview and analysis of gaming and gambling, the behavioral, emotional and psychological warning signs, and considerations for recovery including key principles and barriers. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: Daniel J. Trolaro, MS
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits 6

Wednesday, 3/25/20 and Thursday, 3/26/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm
PDS1166: Motivational Interviewing: Advancing the Practice

The two-day advanced level workshop allows Motivational Interviewing (MI) trained substance use, criminal justice, health care, and social service practitioners to review and expand on the practice of MI care approaches toward effective therapeutic interventions. This two-day training will discuss this effective approach in the treatment of substance use, co-occurring, and other challenging symptoms, and provide participants with an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating these approaches into an effective intervention. Participants will be offered a brief review and practice of, Motivational Interviewing spirit, some basic skills and structure with an overview of what’s important to the client. Participants will learn more about “change talk” and methods of communication to better elicit from clients. We will also consider how Motivational Interviewing overlaps with other models. This course will provide both useful theoretical models and hands-on opportunities to improve skills.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
Fee $200.00
CE Credits: 12

April

Wednesday, 4/1/2020  –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm
PDS3021: “Ten Second Children in a One Second World” – Let’s Not Forget Those With FAS/FASD

The purpose of this course is to offer a comprehensive exploration of FAS/FASD through the lifespan. In addition to presenting the myriad challenging effects-physical, mental, emotional and social- upon a child pre-exposed to alcohol in utero, we will also explore the unique obstacles and difficulties faced by adults with FAS/FASD as they seek to make their way to independence and maintain their dignity in today’s increasingly complex and fast-paced world. It is our goal to offer both a deeper psychological understanding, as well as effective intervention strategies for social service/education providers, as well as effective clinical treatment strategies for those with such difficulties as depression, anxiety, and substance use/abuse.
Instructor:  Roseann Cervelli, MS, LCADC, CCS, CPS
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 clinical

Thursday, 4/2/2020  –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm PDS1664: Counseling, Programming and Policy in the Age of Legal Marijuana

This course will provide an overview of the history of marijuana policy in America and will cover both state and federal laws. It will focus on the most recent US and International studies on marijuana to discuss how it affects the brain and the body. Participants will take part in a discussion about the seven great marijuana myths (including that it is harmless and non-addictive). We will discuss how marijuana criminalization has affected the criminal justice system. The economics of marijuana will be a particular focus, as the instructor will discuss medical marijuana, taxes, regulation, marketing and how marijuana may be a new big tobacco. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: Frank Greenagel, LCSW, LCADC, ACSW, CJC
Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6

Wednesday, 4/8/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm
PDS1533 Participatory Cinema: Cognitive Disorders

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic.  BEST PICTURE alert! We’ve recently launched an innovative lecture series that reviews medication management through film narratives. Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky was our first film to demonstrate how a plot would change if a mental disorder was properly diagnosed and treated. For this seminar, we’ll focus on the diagnosis (and talk a little about pharmacology) in reviewing the cognitive disorders. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Thursday, 4/9/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm PDS 19201: Beyond Abstinence The Future of Addiction Treatment: New and Innovative Approaches to Treatment

The focus of this course is to provide a fresh view of treatment based on current research and challenges facing the field today.  Many of the entrenched concepts, assumptions and protocols in the field will be examined through a scholarly lens. A significant amount of  time will be spent on the role of race and culture as related   to treatment.  The importance of cultural humility that defines “how health care information is received, how rights and protections are exercised, what is considered to be a health problem, how symptoms and concerns about the problem are expressed, who should provide treatment for the problem, and what type of treatment should be given” will be a strong focus in this course.
Instructor: Bob Lynn, EdD, LPC
Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Thursday, 4/16/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm
PDS19102: Substance Use and Youth: Current Trends, Warning Signs, and Engagement Techniques

This workshop encourages increased awareness on the current substance use trends among youth in the Country as well as specifically in the State of New Jersey.  The workshop will place emphasis on the importance of early detection of youth at risk and proactive actions to reduce substance use in this population.  The workshop highlights the benefits of appropriate utilization of engagement techniques, including techniques from motivational interviewing and the nurtured heart approach, in order to effectively detect and address substance use issues in this population.  Lastly, this will introduce the Wraparound Model of Care, which is a holistic approach that includes a focus on family and community engagement to “wrap” around a youth can be utilized with youth struggling from substance use.  Participants will learn how this model of care can be used promote prevention, compliment traditional treatment services, and reinforce sustained recovery from substance use for our youth.
Instructor: Crystal Wytenus, MA, LPC, LCADC, NCC, ACS Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Thursday, 4/23/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm PDS2208: CADC/LCADC Mandatory Renewal Course

The LCADC/ACADC Mandatory Renewal Course meets the requirements for six contact hours of continuing education in legal standards related to the practice of alcohol and drug counseling. [See N.J.A.C. 13:34C-5.2(d)]. In order to register for this seminar, individuals must have an active LCADC/CADC.  NOTE: This course IS NOT approved for initial certification courses C501 or C502. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: William John Kane, JD
Fee:$90.00 CE Credits: 6

Thursday, 4/30/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm
PDS261 Legal and Ethical Issues in Addiction Treatment

This seminar uses case studies, practical applications, and checklists to deliver foremost legal principles including counselor licensing statutes and regulations. Federal, state, and agency laws applicable to alcohol and other drug abuse treatment also covers malpractice liability issues, DWI, domestic violence, employment rights, AIDS, and ADA. Students will become familiar with the federal regulations governing Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse patient records, applicability interacting with HIPAA Privacy Rule and proper handling of subpoenas and court orders. Students will receive real life experience interacting with courts and public agencies by developing a brief report and practice with expert witness testimony. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: William John Kane, JD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Legal

May

Thursday, 5/7/2020    – 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M PDS2062: The Opioid Crisis: Where do we go from Here?

This course will retrace the history of opiate use from opium to prescription drugs and track the long history of heroin use. We will delve into Medical Industrial Complex and look at how Big Pharma, doctors, insurance companies, marketers, the FDA, governmental policies, and consumers each hold some responsibility for the current epidemic. Professor Greenagel will reference the NY Times, LA Times, Washington Post, NBC News, the CDC, a number of professional journals, and scores of local papers to chronicle the history of the crisis. Positive actions that have been taken by local, county, city, and state governments will be examined. We will have a discussion about the Federal response. Data will be reviewed and we will discuss indicators that can be seen as measurable outcomes. This course is steeped in public policy, and the information provided here will be helpful to clinicians and clinical directors for use in individual and group sessions, as well as program design (improvement) and evaluation. Fair warning: it will be extremely difficult to leave this course and not be angry. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours. Instructor: Frank Greenagel, MPAP, LCSW, LCADC, CASC, CJC, CCS Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6   

Wednesday 5/13/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm PDS7907 Participatory Cinema: Personality Disorders (Star Wars)

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. 
Perhaps the most famous tagline in motion picture history is “No, I am your father” uttered by Darth Vader. Why is Vader perhaps the most evil villain ever depicted? Is Luke Skywalker’s destiny predetermined upon learning he is Vader’s son? We’ll have the answers even before George Lucas or Walt Disney even considered the question by reviewing the etiology and pathogenesis of the personality disorders.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Thursday, 5/14/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm
PDS1503: Connecting with Spirituality in Addiction Treatment

Spirituality can impact mental health and functioning in positive and negative ways though there can be discomfort by clinicians to bring it up in treatment. This seminar will explore ways clinicians can assess and incorporate spirituality into treatment, the importance of including spirituality, and the challenges in this area. Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD,R RYT Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6 Clinical

Wednesday, 5/20/20 and Thursday, 5/21/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm
PDS2132: Motivational Interviewing: Practice of Supervision and Coaching

This two-day training will include effective methods of supervising workers and provide an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating effective interventions with workers in motivating them to grow in skill and work with our most “challenging” clients. The experience of parallel process using Motivational Interviewing in supervision and coaching staff in using the spirit, structure and skills will be illustrated using case presentations and interactive exercises. This course best defined as a worker centered guiding method for enhancing the intrinsic motivation within the worker by helping them to explore their counter transference and while using Motivational Interviewing as a client centered, evidence based model of treatment with clients in ambivalence. ​The Motivational Interviewing Assessment: Supervisory Tools for Enhancing Proficiency (MIA:STEP) package is a collection of tools for mentoring counselors and other clinicians in the use of MI skills during clinical assessments. During the NIDA clinical trials research the MI assessment protocol improved both client attendance and retention during the first four weeks of outpatient care. The researchers also discovered that the development and maintenance of MI skills was a challenge for the counselors engaged in the study. Participating in workshop training was not sufficient preparation. Ongoing feedback and mentoring were needed in order for most counselors to use MI skillfully. This package of products is meant to be used in the context of clinical supervision or mentoring. Use of these tools can help enhance both counselor MI skills and the quality and nature of the mentoring process. It’s a win-win for clients and agency staff alike.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP Fee: $200.00 CE Credits: 12 Clinical

Thursday, 5/28/20     – 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
PDS19303 From the Bottom Up

Providers of substance abuse treatment recognize that most clients have trauma histories that complicate treatment and compromise recovery. Kaiser Permanente’s Adverse Childhood Experiences study has clearly established the link between traumatic childhood experiences and the risk of developing addictions. The reality is that we can no longer just treat the substance use disorder; the underlying trauma must also be addressed. Leading trauma experts have demonstrated that unresolved trauma is often stored in the body and interventions designed to primarily target cognitions are ineffective for individuals with complex trauma histories. Treatment programs are now seeking to adopt interventions that also treat the emotional and physical manifestations of trauma to improve recovery outcomes for their clients. This workshop will present a trauma-informed model of addiction treatment that combines sound addiction treatment protocols, poly vagal theory, emotional regulation skills training and body-based interventions. It will offer experiential exercises for participants to practice emotional regulation and body based interventions they can use in group and individual treatment. Instructor: Debra Ruisard, DSW, LCSW Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6 clinical

June

Wednesday 6/3/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm PDS7907 Participatory Cinema: Non-Substance Related Disorders (Tag)

Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. 
What does it take for a person to play a life-long game of tag? Can the answer to this question lie in the Non-Substance Related Disorders chapter of the DSM-5? We’ll review each of these disorders and discuss their similarities and differences when compared to the Substance Use Disorders.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6 Clinical

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Thursday, 6/4/20 –  9:00 am to 4:00 pm PDS9105: 21st Century Drugs: Modern Drugs and Micro / Macro Strategies

This cutting-edge, clinical presentation covers the 21st century drugs: synthetic cannaboids (K2, spice, space), bath salts, Adderall, buprenorphine, and oxycodone. Whether you are a therapist who specializes in addiction or not, there is an excellent chance your clients have been affected by these substances. Participants will be taught the side effects, withdrawal symptoms, street names, costs, common places these chemicals are bought, legal issues around them, and strategies you can use to treat your clients. I will also discuss programs and policies that have (and can) helped address these substances on the macro level. This workshop does not qualify for NBCC clock hours.
Instructor: Frank Greenagel, MPAP, LCSW, LCADC, CASAC, ICADC, ACSW, CJC, CCS Fee: $90.00 CE Credits: 6



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