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Laura Lesnewich

Graduate Assistant

Office: SMH 140

Email: laura.lesnewich@rutgers.edu

Phone: 848-445-9340

  • Bio
  • Current Research
  • Selected Publications
  • Recent Awards
  • Other Information

Bio

Laura joined the Center of Alcohol Studies in 2013 as a post-baccalaureate research assistant in Dr. Marsha Bates’s Cardiac Neuroscience Laboratory. During this time, she spearheaded a longitudinal study on post-college alcohol use behaviors and developed interests in neuroscience and the cardiovascular system. In 2015, Laura started the Rutgers Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program as Dr. Bates’s graduate student. She completed her Master’s degree in 2018 with a project examining resting-state brain networks in young adults with major depressive disorder. Currently, Laura is working on her dissertation research, which aims to identify neural and cardiovascular biomarkers of alcohol use behavior change during emerging adulthood. Her work is supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) through the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31) grant mechanism. In addition to her research, Laura receives training in evidence based assessment and treatment of adult psychopathology as part of her doctoral studies.

 

Current Research

Laura is currently working on her dissertation project entitled “Neural and Autonomic Markers of Alcohol Use Behavior Change in Emerging Adulthood: A Prospective Study.” She is also working on several other projects in Dr. Marsha Bates’s Cardiac Neuroscience Laboratory that examine heart rate variability in depression, alcohol cue reactivity in the brain, and a novel method of studying oscillations in brain activity.

Selected Publications

Lesnewich, L. M., Conway, F. N., Buckman, J. F., Brush, C. J., Ehmann, P. J., Eddie, D., Olson, R. L., Alderman, B. L. & Bates, M. E. (2019). Associations of depression severity with heart rate and heart rate variability in young adults across normative and clinical populations. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 142, 57-65.

Conway F. N., Domingues M., Monaco R., Lesnewich L. M., Ray A. E., Alderman B. L., Todaro S. M., Buckman J. F. (2018). Concussion symptom underreporting among incoming NCAA Division I college athletes. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.

Lesnewich, L. M., Ray, S., Helton, S. G., Gohel, S., Buckman, J. F., & Bates, M. E. (2018, June). Central executive network functional connectivity is associated with alcohol use behaviors in emerging adulthood. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, San Diego, CA.

Banu, L. M., Peyser, D., Helton, S. G., Ray, S., Buckman, J. F., & Bates, M. E. (2017, March). Paced breathing changes neural reactivity to alcohol cues: An fMRI study. Poster presented at the annual meeting of Society of Addiction Psychology Collaborative Perspectives on Addiction, Albuquerque, NM.

Banu, L. M., Buckman, J. F., Ray, S., & Bates, M. E. (2016, June). Greater BOLD reactivity to personalized alcohol cues in non-treatment-seeking individuals with an alcohol use disorder. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, New Orleans, LA.

Banu, L. M., Buckman, J. F., Olson, R. L., Brush, C. J., Eddie, D., Peyser, D., Bates, M. E., Shors, T., & Alderman, B. L. (2016, March). Relationships between alcohol use, depression, and neurocardiac functioning. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Addiction Psychology Collaborative Perspectives on Addiction, San Diego, CA.

Recent Awards

2019 National Institute on Drug Abuse R13 Travel Award
2018 Research Society on Alcoholism Student Merit Award
2016 Mechanisms of Behavior Change (MOBC) RSA Satellite Session Travel Award

 

Other Information

Research Interests: Broadly, Laura’s research interests include neural, visceral, and environmental correlates of substance use behavior. She is particularly interested in neural and cardiovascular predictors of change in alcohol and other substance use behaviors over the life span and “natural” behavior change that occurs outside the context of formal treatment.

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