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Live Online Seminar

A live online seminar is a web-based seminar that is taught live in real-time by an instructor, and it provides CE credit hours. You will view and listen to the presentation online, and you will be able to ask the speaker questions via live chat. The seminars work on all computers (Windows PC, Apple Mac, etc.) and handheld devices (iPhone, Android, iPad, Tablets, etc.). For instruction concerning how to use Zoom, CLICK HERE

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JANUARY

 

Wednesday, January 27, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM32:  Participatory Cinema: Cognitive Disorders 
Cat’s Eye (1985) is an anthology horror film written by Stephen King that comprises three stories that are connected by the presence of a stray cat. Participants will watch Cat’s Eye and follow the feline drifter through yet another tale: Disney’s Cinderella, as a unique way to review environmental toxins and acute confusional states such as delirium.  Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6   (not approved for hours through NBCC)

 

 

Thursday and Friday, January 28 – 29, 2021   –    10:00AM to 3:00PM
ZOOM421: Motivational Interviewing: Practice of Supervision and Coaching
This two-day training will include effective methods of supervising workers and provide an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating effective interventions with workers in motivating them to grow in skill and work with our most “challenging” clients. The experience of parallel process using Motivational Interviewing in supervision and coaching staff in using the spirit, structure and skills will be illustrated using case presentations and interactive exercises. This course best defined as a worker centered guiding method for enhancing the intrinsic motivation within the worker by helping them to explore their counter transference and while using Motivational Interviewing as a client centered, evidence based model of treatment with clients in ambivalence. ​The Motivational Interviewing Assessment: Supervisory Tools for Enhancing Proficiency (MIA:STEP) package is a collection of tools for mentoring counselors and other clinicians in the use of MI skills during clinical assessments. During the NIDA clinical trials research the MI assessment protocol improved both client attendance and retention during the first four weeks of outpatient care. The researchers also discovered that the development and maintenance of MI skills was a challenge for the counselors engaged in the study. Participating in workshop training was not sufficient preparation. Ongoing feedback and mentoring were needed in order for most counselors to use MI skillfully. This package of products is meant to be used in the context of clinical supervision or mentoring. Use of these tools can help enhance both counselor MI skills and the quality and nature of the mentoring process. It’s a win-win for clients and agency staff alike.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
Fee: $200.00
CE Credits: 9 Clinical

 

 

FEBRUARY

 

Tuesday and Wednesday, February 2 – 3, 2021   –    10:00AM to 3:00PM
ZOOM421:  Motivational Interviewing: The Power of Groups
This two-day training will provide information on how to use groups as a treatment strategy and incorporate Motivational Interviewing. We will address why using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is extremely effective. Group work provides several important steps that help break isolation often experienced by a consumer.  This training experience will provide information on the issues and care of special populations (adolescents, dual diagnosis, addiction, intimacy, low-income families, parents, etc.) through the use of support groups in care.  We will also explore the issues of assessment, interaction, group norms, and various forms of support for the consumer within the context of Motivational Interviewing. We will also address “why” the therapeutic support group format is extremely effective.  We will also assess how the role of the group leader and the roles of the participants play in the group process and explore the importance of therapeutic contracts, goal setting, group frequency, duration and process some stages of group development.
Instructor: Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
Fee: $180.00
CE Credits: 9 Clinical

 

Thursday, February 4, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM132:  From the Bottom Up
Providers of substance abuse treatment recognize that most clients have trauma histories that complicate treatment and compromise recovery. Kaiser Permanente’s Adverse Childhood Experiences study has clearly established the link between traumatic childhood experiences and the risk of developing addictions. The reality is that we can no longer just treat the substance use disorder; the underlying trauma must also be addressed. Leading trauma experts have demonstrated that unresolved trauma is often stored in the body and interventions designed to primarily target cognitions are ineffective for individuals with complex trauma histories. Treatment programs are now seeking to adopt interventions that also treat the emotional and physical manifestations of trauma to improve recovery outcomes for their clients. This workshop will present a trauma-informed model of addiction treatment that combines sound addiction treatment protocols, poly vagal theory, emotional regulation skills training and body-based interventions. It will offer experiential exercises for participants to practice emotional regulation and body based interventions they can use in group and individual treatment.
Instructor: Debra Ruisard, DSW, LCSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Thursday, February 11, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM451:   Dialectical Behavioral Therapy: Working with Substance Use Disorders
Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) addressing a variety of presenting problems that are related to emotion dysregulation.  There have been adaptations made to the original model that was designed to treat borderline personality disorder to address the treatment of co-occurring substance use disorders.  This workshop will review the foundations of DBT such as the biosocial theory, dialectical abstinence, mindfulness, and the importance of balancing acceptance and change techniques. It will focus on strategies for using DBT with substance use disorders.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD, RYT
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Thursday, February 18, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM461:  CRAFT: Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training
The Community reinforcement family training (CRAFT) is a skills-based program designed to impact families in multiple areas of their lives, including self-care, pleasurable activities, problem solving, and goal setting. CRAFT addresses their loved one’s resistance to change, in addition to teaching families behavioral and motivational strategies for interacting with their loved one. Participants learn how to eliminate positive reinforcement for drinking and the power of positive reinforcement for sobriety and positive behavior. Families learn how to withdraw positive reinforcement for unwanted behavior and how to use positive communication skills to improve interactions and maximize their influence. The proposed goals of CRAFT: 1) Promote continued abstinence. 2) Reduce the risk of family violence. 3) Minimize distress and increase positive lifestyles for all family members. 4) Prepare the concerned significant other (CSO) to support the substance abuser during his/her treatment. 5) Prepare the CSO to suggest re-engagement in treatment if relapse occurs.
Instructor: Thomas Etts, LCSW, LCADC
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Wednesday, February 24, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM471:  Participatory Cinema: Bipolar and Related Disorders
 If a single line from a script ever influenced a film, this is the Disney film that’s worth analysis! The first entirely animated film to win the prestigious Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, The Incredibles (2004) is a computer-generated film set in an alternate version of the 1960s. Once the seminal scene is identified, we’ll launch a discussion that incorporates The Incredibles and Stephen King’s Misery that reviews stimulants and the potential role they play in the presentation of mental illness including the Bipolar and Related Disorders.    Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol & Substance Use Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. 
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 

 

 

MARCH

 

Thursday, March 4, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM261:  The Nurtured Heart Approach ®: Transforming Substance Use Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Outcomes
The Nurtured Heart Approach® (NHA) is a relationship-focused methodology that is an effective tool for creating healthy relationships and repairing strained relationships. Founded strategically in “The 3 Stands™” for helping individuals build Inner Wealth ™ and assisting individuals to use their intensity in successful ways. In children, strong Inner Wealth is correlated to successful prevention practices. In addition, individuals struggling with substance use can benefit from developing a strong Inner Wealth to build resiliency and rebuild relationships with their support networks.  The utilization of the Nurtured Heart Approach ® with this population can promote prevention, compliment treatment efforts and enhance sustained recovery from substances.
Instructors: Crystal Wytenus, LPC, LCADC, NCC, ACS, Nurtured Heart Approach ®Advanced Trainer, and Whitney Chiriboga-Espinales, LSW                                                  Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Thursday, March 11, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM481:  Racial Awareness in the Therapy Room
Race is an important identity for many individuals, particularly people of color, though it is often not discussed explicitly in the therapy room.  Those individuals who identify as white may not prioritize race as one of their identities or have a comfort level discussing how their race may impact the therapeutic relationship.  A client’s perception of the clinician’s racial awareness can impact engagement in treatment.  The seminar will explore cultural competence, cultural humility, microaggressions and implicit bias and its relevance in practicing ethically.  Strategies for conceptualizing and discussing race and the intersectionality of identities will be explored.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD, RYT
 
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Thursday, March 18, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM12:  From Social Gaming to Internet Gambling: Identifying the Connection, Addressing the Issues, and Establishing Meaningful Recovery Principles
Consistently, there are more creative and fast paced forms of entertainment to help people escape, cope, or adjust to the stressors of life. Whether finding it through substance, social media, YouTube, or a variety of other methods, individuals are becoming more daring, tech savvy and tech dependent. From a technology perspective, one area that has seen explosive growth exists in the world of skill-based, social and internet gaming. The rise in popularity of eSports and Daily Fantasy Sports (DFS) has resulted in an increase in gamers worldwide seeking fast-paced action, escape, and sometimes a chance to win money. With that in mind, studies have started to show a correlation between early onset adolescent gaming as a gateway to problem gambling or other potential issues that may arise later in life. Problem gambling is linked to many individual, public health, and social problems including: depression, suicide, significant debt, bankruptcy, family conflict, domestic violence, neglect and maltreatment of children and criminal offenses. As with any addiction, treatment and early intervention utilizing various approaches can be very effective. This workshop will provide an overview and analysis of gaming and gambling, the behavioral, emotional and psychological warning signs, and considerations for recovery including key principles and barriers.
Instructor: Daniel J. Trolaro, MS
 
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6

 

Wednesday, March 24, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM371:  Integrating Peer Services: Working Collaboratively With Other Professionals
Peer recovery support services have started to become integrated into various organizations and community service providers. In response to the opioid epidemic numerous emergency departments have started to utilize peer services in an attempt to link overdose patients to services. The role and utilization of peer services has expanded faster than standards for integration. As the use of peer services continues to evolve lack of integration into traditional teams has led to inconsistency in the deployment of peer services. Confusion is abound due to the uncertainty of traditional providers on what peers can and cannot do. This seminar will focus on helping attendees integrate peer services into their organizations and advocate for their inclusion into the treatment team.
Instructor: Morgan Thompson, MSW, Sabrina Sabater, MSW, and Andrew Walsh, MSW, LSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 

 

Thursday, March 25, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM491:  Group Dynamics
Instructor: Thomas Etts, LCSW, LCADC
 
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Wednesday, March 31, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM501: Participatory Cinema: Cannabis and Tobacco Disorders
Lilo & Stitch (2002) is an animated science fiction comedy-drama that evolves around the exploits of a young Hawaiian girl named Lilo and an extraterrestrial (named Experiment 626 a.k.a. Stitch). We’ll related the Disney film to Stephen King’s Dreamcatcher; the turning point of which depicts Jonesy being struck by a car. The accidents are not the only way these two films intertwine! Join us to investigate the link between these two movies and how they review cannabis, tobacco, and related disorders such as cannabis-induced sleep disorders.   
Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic. 
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6

 

APRIL

 

Thursday, April 1, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM53:  Substance Use and Youth: Current Trends, Warning Signs, and Engagement Techniques
This workshop encourages increased awareness on the current substance use trends among youth in the Country as well as specifically in the State of New Jersey.  The workshop will place emphasis on the importance of early detection of youth at risk and proactive actions to reduce substance use in this population.  The workshop highlights the benefits of appropriate utilization of engagement techniques, including techniques from motivational interviewing and the nurtured heart approach, in order to effectively detect and address substance use issues in this population.  Lastly, this will introduce the Wraparound Model of Care, which is a holistic approach that includes a focus on family and community engagement to “wrap” around a youth can be utilized with youth struggling from substance use.  Participants will learn how this model of care can be used promote prevention, compliment traditional treatment services, and reinforce sustained recovery from substance use for our youth.
Instructor: Crystal Wytenus, MA, LPC, LCADC, NCC, ACS
fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Thursday, April 8, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM42:  Beyond Abstinence The Future of Addiction Treatment: New and Innovative Approaches to Treatment
The focus of this course is to provide a fresh view of treatment based on current research and challenges facing the field today.  Many of the entrenched concepts, assumptions and protocols in the field will be examined through a scholarly lens. A significant amount of  time will be spent on the role of race and culture as related   to treatment.  The importance of cultural humility that defines “how health care information is received, how rights and protections are exercised, what is considered to be a health problem, how symptoms and concerns about the problem are expressed, who should provide treatment for the problem, and what type of treatment should be given” will be a strong focus in this course. The challenges in viewing outcomes through a narrow abstinence lens will be presented.
Instructor: Bob Lynn, EdD, LPC
fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Friday, April 9, 2021   –    10:00AM to 3:00PM
ZOOM561: Trauma and Addictions: Clinical Considerations
Webinar includes a presentation on opioids followed by an interactive panel and case study discussion on domestic violence.
Instructors – TBD
fee: $99.00
CE Credits: 1 Opioid CE Hour, 4 Domestic Violence CE Hours

 

Thursday, April 15, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM511: Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills to Navigate Racial Injustice
Racial injustice can lead to individual and collective racial trauma.  The pain and suffering of trauma can be reduced with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT).  DBT balances skills for accepting what cannot be change in the moment and changing what we can. DBT tends to focus on individual experiences of invalidation which leads to emotional dysregulation.  This seminar will expand the concept of invalidation to include invalidation based on race that is reinforced by society across generations.  Mindfulness skills will be addressed that help observe thoughts, feelings and sensations about racial injustice and racism in the United States.  Dialectical responses to racism will be explored.  Radical acceptance is discussed in DBT as well as other mindfulness based spiritual traditions to explore how one reduces suffering by accepting what one cannot change in the moment.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD, RYT
fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Wednesday, April 21, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM521:  Participatory Cinema: Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders
Welcome to the Jeopardy answer to the question, “What is the only film Stephen King has ever directed?” Maximum Overdrive (1986) is a comedy horror film loosely based on King’s short story “Trucks.” We’ll link the film to Disney’s Cars, making this seminar about “trucks and cars” and as such, create a dialogue that reviews psychotic disorders and substance use disorders including inhalant intoxication and inhalant-induced mental disorders.
Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 

 

Thursday, April 22, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM22:  Counseling, Programming and Policy in the Age of Legal Marijuana
This course will provide an overview of the history of marijuana policy in America and will cover both state and federal laws. It will focus on the most recent US and International studies on marijuana discussing how it affects the brain and the body. Participants will take part in a discussion about the seven great marijuana myths (including that it is harmless and non-addictive). We will discuss how marijuana criminalization has impacted the criminal justice system. The economics of marijuana will be a particular focus, as the instructor will discuss medical marijuana, taxes, regulation, marketing and how marijuana may be a new big tobacco.
Instructor: Frank Greenagel, MPAP, MSW, LCSW, LCADC, ACSW, ICADC, CJC, CCS
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6

 

Wednesday, April 28, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM211:  Ethical Considerations for Peer Work
Numerous studies have shown the efficacy of peer services for substance use disorder services. Peers with lived experience can aid individuals and families affected by substance use disorders in their recovery and linkage to services. However, there are numerous ethical pitfalls associated with peer work. These challenges include privacy and confidentiality, boundaries and dual relationships, and continuity of service. Additionally, patient brokering and other predatory referral practices have become areas of focus for various law enforcement agencies. Recently drafted legislation and court law has led to increased scrutiny of ethical behavior of peer services. This seminar help attendees identify unethical situations, how to avoid them, and what to do if they encounter them.
Instructor: Andrew Walsh, MSW, LSW
fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 

 

Thursday, April 29, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM72: Cross-cultural Communication for Addiction Professionals
Every community, population, and group has its own culture, but how is culture understood when it is mainly comprised of unwritten rules? Culture is more than age, race, gender, and socioeconomic status. However, it can be difficult to assess the way culture shapes the identity of self and the way identity guides how we serve others. How does cultural competence differ from cultural sensitivity? And where does cultural awareness come into play? Participants will be able to list the components that constitute culture: norms, values, language, artifacts, technology, and symbols. Participants will be guided in critiquing their self-identified culture. The impact of implicit bias on professionalism will be discussed. Participants will be able to state the difference between cultural competence, cultural awareness, cultural sensitivity, and cultural humility. Participants will demonstrate the differences in approach to those in positions of power, while illustrating skills needed to build trustful relationships. Participants will construct effective strategies for communication that addresses potential barriers and builds relationships of trust.
Instructor: Regina Ford, MS
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Cultural Competence

 

MAY

 

Wednesday, May 5, 2021   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM251:  Recovery Coaching with Youth and Young Adults
The average age of alcohol and drug experimentation for boys and girls continues to decrease. Youth substance use disorders continue to rise. Existing programs have expanded their offerings to include youth services. Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of peer services for individuals and families impacted by substance use disorders. However traditional peer services need to be tailored to meet the specific needs of youth and their families. This seminar will focus on providing attendees with the information necessary to leverage peer services provided to youths.
Instructor: Morgan Thompson, MSW and Sabrina Sabater, MSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 

 

Thursday, May 6, 2021   –  9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM301:  Connection Through Self-Compassion and Compassion for Others: Reaching and Teaching the Minds and Hearts of Those We Serve
Research in Neuroscience and the application of Compassion Focused Therapies have provided us with the information that the practice of Mindful Self-Compassion and Compassion for others has far-reaching effects on one’s physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual health. In her book, “Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself,” Kristen Neff details how self -kindness, mindfulness and a sense of common humanity, can replace the negative and diminishing self-criticism and self-judgment that so many engage in. Compassion therapies help to minimize destructive patterns of fear, anxiety, self-criticism and isolation, which if left untreated, can often lead to such at-risk behaviors as the experimentation, use and abuse of alcohol/drugs, eating disorders, suicidal ideation etc. Mindful Self-Compassion practice has been shown to aid in managing stress and trauma as well as the grieving processes which so many experience in their lives.
Instructor: Roseann Cervelli, MS, LCADC, CCS, CPS
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Clinical

 

Thursday, May 13, 2021   –  9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM531: A Journey to Cultural Humility: Challenging Incongruence and Bias in Clinical Practice- Part I
In order to challenge racial disparities, we must start at home, with us, the clinicians and practitioners. This requires a dual examination of the role of institutionalized racism and other forms of oppression in the field along with a commitment to understand and identify the ways in which our own acts of microaggression (whether intentional and/or unintentional) impact our work with one another and clients. Microaggressions are unintentional, subconscious expressions of racism and other forms of oppression that occur in our everyday personal and professional lives and thus inform and impact our work with clients (Forest-Bank, 2016; Spencer, 2017). Microaggressions occur towards those who are of marginalized populations based on ability, religion, sexuality, gender, status, age and mental health problems (Sue, 2010). Understanding microaggressions provides a concrete example of the ways in which racism and systems of privilege can be subtle and unintentional and can be a powerful tool for combatting racism and discrimination (Forrest-Bank, 2016). As one increases his or her knowledge regarding microaggressions, it is natural to speculate on the origins of these thoughts and behaviors. This deliberation compels us to examine our own values and beliefs that are ingrained through culture, experiences, and racial identity development. Our values and beliefs can manifest into microaggressions, furthering the cycle of oppression (Edmonds-Cady & Wingfield, 2017). As we assess our development, we will begin to make strides through the stages of the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity continuum, transitioning from an ethnocentric worldview to an ethnorelative worldview (Hernandez & Kose, 2012).
Instructor: Natalie Moore-Bembry, EdD, MSW, LSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Cultural

 

Thursday, May 20, 2021   –  9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM541: A Journey to Cultural Humility: From Reflection to Action through Intergroup Discourse- Part II
In order to progress from an ethnocentric worldview to an ethnorelative worldview, we must become culturally humble. Cultural humility refers to one’s ability to be open and willing to reflect on his or her own self as a cultural human being (Hook & Watkins, 2015). It is a lifelong process of self-reflection and self-critique that involves learning about another person’s culture while reflecting on one’s own beliefs and values and requires the practitioner to shift roles from being the expert to becoming a learner in order to effectively work with others (Foronda, Baptiste, Reinholdt, & Ousman, 2016; Fisher-Borne, Montana Cain, & Martin, 2015). The concepts of intersectionality and cultural humility are key elements of enhancing this lifelong process of learning and self-awareness in ourselves. Intersectionality as a framework is crucial to analyzing power and privilege, specifically focusing on the intersection of privilege and oppression. The practitioner has a dual role to learn and implement this concept in their personal and professional lives (Bubar, Cespedes, & Bundy-Fazioli, 2016). Intergroup discourse allows practitioners to reflect on and share their thoughts and experiences in a brave space through a nonhierarchical group. The Allies Model requires clinicians to be committed to life-long learning and growth, to use the privileges of a clinicians intersecting social identities to stand with marginalized groups, and to stand against intentional and unintentional forms of oppression. Being an ally denotes that we will be part of an inclusive community, stay in relationship with peers and colleagues, and to practice accountability to ourselves and each other by “calling in” rather than “calling out”. To become an ally, we must continually work on becoming culturally humble. This is a life-long process that can be achieved in an intergroup discourse with similar people.
Instructor: Natalie Moore-Bembry, EdD, MSW, LSW
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6 Cultural

 

Wednesday, May 26, 2021   –  9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM102: Participatory Cinema: Personality Disorders
Two timeless classics collide when we highlight Beauty and the Beast in this day’s seminar. The film is an animated musical romantic fantasy and the third film released during the Disney Renaissance period. We’ll investigate the 1756 French fairy tale on which the film is based and relate the less romanticized version with Stephen King’s The Shining. In doing so, we’ll create a dialogue that reviews the sexual disorders and substance use disorders including the alcohol-induced mental disorders. 
Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6

 

JUNE

 

Wednesday and Thursday, June 2-3, 2021   –  9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM551: Dialectical Behavioral Therapy: Strategies for Individual Sessions
DBT is an evidenced based treatment which has shown its effectiveness with treating emotion dysregulation and related self-harm behaviors. DBT has been adapted for different populations across different settings. This seminar will provide an overview of DBT skills and core concepts such as biosocial theory of emotion dysregulation, dialectics, dialectical abstinence, behaviorism, behavior chain analysis, and mindfulness that can be incorporated into clinical work. There will be a discussion of ways to adapt the treatment to meet the fundamental principles of DBT for a  variety of settings.
Instructor: Nathalie Edmond, PsyD, RYT
Fee: $200.00
CE Credits: 12 Clinical

 

Wednesday, June 23, 2021   –  9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM142: Participatory Cinema: Non-Substance Related Disorders
Welcome to the Jeopardy answer to the question, “What film was Stephen King’s screenwriting debut?” We take a one-month break from Once Upon a Time in Castle Rock to analyze Creepshow (1982); a horror anthology directed by George A. Romero. Creepshow ties together five stories, the first of which is Father’s Day! Participants will draw one teaching point from each story for a unique review of the Personality Disorders.
Movies have long been utilized to highlight varied areas in the field of psychiatry including the role of the psychiatrist, issues in medical ethics, and the stigma toward people with mental illness. At Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, comprehensive curricula have been created utilizing films as fictional case accounts of mental disorders. At the Center of Alcohol Studies, facilitated discussion of a selected film is achieved via social media as well as traditional PowerPoint didactic. Each seminar will show a feature-length film with a live Twitter feed on the screen that will transform the movie into an educational didactic.
Instructor: Anthony Tobia, MD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6

 

 

TBD   –    9:00AM to 4:00PM
ZOOM62:  CADC/LCADC Mandatory Renewal Course
The LCADC/CADC Mandatory Renewal Course meets the requirements for six contact hours of continuing education in legal standards related to the practice of alcohol and drug counseling. [See N.J.A.C. 13:34C-5.2(d)]. In order to register for this seminar, individuals must have an active LCADC/CADC.  NOTE: This course IS NOT approved for initial certification courses C501 or C502.
Instructor: TBD
Fee: $90.00
CE Credits: 6

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